Wrap – up Reflection – ‘Awesome free stuff – ask your library!’

Community of learning

I saw my role in the community this semester as a student, with a learning blog, expressing my interest in discrete aspects of the learning program. I wasn’t keen to critically analyse others’ comments, although I was happy for others to challenge my views, and to respond appropriately to those comments.

My nature is to be collaborative rather than radical and I tended to comment positively and supportively on peers’ posts. To be honest, I did not feel particularly opposed to any of the posts that I read. I sometimes added my opinion or shared a personal or professional experience or link on the posts as evidence-based understanding of the topic.

I noticed that there was a greater activity on posts at the assignment 1 checkpoint and again after the lecture in relation to CLA Toolkit.   The CLA toolkit connection did not happen for me as I understood from discussions during the Week 2 class that it was optional rather than optimal and have not resolved the login difficulty, and did not have a validated sign in until Week 13. On that note, I felt unable to fix the problem. This impacted negatively on my attitude toward engaging with the learning community.

Despite my lack of interaction using CLA Toolkit (which incidentally I was really interested in seeing how it worked once explained to me in the second session), I feel that my contributions would not have been differently positioned, but may have been greater in number and frequency.

The quality of information from my peers was amazing, presenting a plethora of perspectives on a broad spectrum of topics, especially in relation to GLAM, makerspaces and children’s programs.

Twitter and me

Twitter was a wonderful learning experience for me as I was not confident to use Twitter regularly at the start of the semester but feel much more confident about it now. I really enjoyed the challenge of Twitter Chats in organising the information before the chat and setting up with a twitter tool to enhance the experience.

I think that Twitter is a valuable social media tool for quick short shallow conversations with the advantage of linking out to more in-depth information, but I did not like it as a stand-alone learning tool. I found it too short, too sharp, too shallow to properly discuss the topics.

If Twitter chats were run in conjunction with a regular online class, I think I would have gained more from the chats. I really appreciated the links out to relevant information from Clare and other students, and the snapshot of interaction with other library professionals.

As a result of the Twitter Chat component of the course, I have been using Twitter more as a connection with library professionals and my peers. I like it because it is concise, succinct, and can be a very clever conversation tool.  Having experienced Twitter Chat as part of this unit, I am more likely to join industry specific twitter chats as part of ongoing learning.

I recently re-tweeted a twitter comment from a scientist who remarked that Twitter = workmates playground and Facebook = family and friends playground, because it aptly describes my use of twitter too (although I do sometimes use it for personal communications)

My take-away – ‘Awesome free stuff? – Ask your library’

My key take-away for the unit is that we should all be wearing badges that say ‘Awesome free stuff? – ask your library!’ because the diversity of programs available through libraries – public, private, institutional and academic – is awesome.

The Readers’ Advisory programs, Book Chat and the family oriented literacy programs like First 5 Forever and CoderDojo really struck a chord with me as great community connectors.

I like the training and education programs offered for all ages, from children and teens with coding classes, to career resume builders, and tech-savvy for seniors and others. Libraries are a hub for life long learning – this I think ties with my key take-away, that libraries offer awesome free stuff!

I enjoyed exploring the movement toward Makerspaces and amalgamation of GLAM organisations under the library banner, with the aim of presenting digital and physical resources to the public. Creativity and innovation are key to learning and discovery.

Personally, I realized that not all teaching styles align with all learning styles and that this unit challenged my ability to understand the course framework – what was required, and where to find the information. I felt really disconnected. I did not have a clear understanding of what it was that was required.

I know that I missed the lack of interaction through classes, and the opportunity to hear guest presenters share their knowledge and industry experience in relation to topics covered.

I focussed on extra-curricular learning, observing library programs, products and services while completing fieldwork placements, attending and participating in 23 Research Data Things, and attending other professional development events.

The quality of my work

I acknowledge that this unit has not been my finest work. I am not confident that I have understood the requirements and the parameters of the course.   I regret the misunderstanding about CLA Toolkit and the lack of interaction with that tool.

Blogging and commenting have not been my strong points. I was very concerned at the first check point, after receiving negative feedback. I sought help with these issues and feel that I have now better responded to the assessment criteria.  Blogging weekly is a call to action and meeting that obligation is compulsory practice which built my skills and my confidence.

In relation to the grant application assessment, I enjoyed the challenge and appreciate that these applications are an essential skill to support library programs. I feel that my choice of program (Get2thGames Hackathon) was difficult due to my inexperience in that field, and additionally, writing the project concurrently with weekly blogs was quite a workload.  Notwithstanding this, I enjoyed the learning curve.

Program Review – Gold Coast University Hospital Health Library – JBI training

The GCUH Health Library operates from with Queensland Health’s Gold Coast Hospital Services at Southport and Robina.  The mission of the library is to facilitate access to high quality information and customer service .. in information discovery, retrieval and management … deliver(ing) responsive and innovation services and resources in support of patient care, research, management…” for GCUH Health Service health professionals and students.

Within this overarching mission, the library  has sought to understand its users’ needs and information seeking behaviours through qualitative and quantitative analysis, including a consultative process with users, non-users, industry professionals and other stakeholders.  This aligns with a model recommended by Joanna Ludbrooke.    The library offers a suite of  regular short lunch-time programs to GCUH staff and students [patrons] designed to develop their navigation skills facilitating access to relevant information from any of the databases available online at any time.   In particular, nursing staff regularly refer to the Joanna Briggs Institute [JBI] database  in the course of their duty.  Therefore, their ability to quickly access information is essential, as it is can be critical to patient care.

The Joanna Briggs Institute database provides information to nursing staff and is designed to guide nurses to identify the issue, test their diagnosis, administer appropriate interventions at the point of care.   The two publication types most used are firstly, the evidence summaries based on structured searches of litérature and evidence-based health care databases and secondly, évidence based recommended practices providing the best available évidence including an equipment list, a recommended practice, OHS provisions and an évidence summary where available.

The éducation program for patrons was designed to run for approximately 20 minutes at 12.10 and again at 1.10 to fit with patrons’ regular lunch breaks.  The format of the program was an overview of the system, the main features, the popular publication types and the expected results from the program.  The research librarians created a PowerPoint présentation using screen captures and call-outs to indicate the preferred méthod of navigation.  The dedicated area within the library was set up with comfortable seating, side tables for note-taking and a projection screen connecter to a laptop.

A pre-run of the présentation ensured there were no technical glitches.    From my perspective with no health industry expérience and limited health library experience, the présentation logically and simply explained the pathways within the program for the benefit of any new users.

However, despite the well-planned structure of the program which had content, context, relevance, currency and relativity – busy hospital staff and health professionals did not attend.  Short lunch breaks are not long enough to include a serving of professional development,  as well as a deserved meal break.

Perhaps the library could consider delivering the présentations to staff rooms closer to clinics or wards so that patrons could benefit from their sharing of knowledge and information.  They could also trial social media as a means of communication.  However I believe that the major barrier to the ongoing délivery of this excellent program is dépendent on commitment and support of the parent organisation to give patrons more time to  take advantage of the librarians’ expertise and willingness to co-ordinate instructive sessions.

A further initiative of the GCUHH Library program was the issue of a Quality Scale Survey, enabling them to measure the success of the program and inviting comments about future programs.   The survey focussed on outcomes for the user asking questions about content, basis and navigation of JBI, ability to access JBI, available reports, understanding of advanced searching and overall satisfaction with JBI.   Unfortunately with the lack of patronage all of this excellent planning did not déliver results at this time.

Community of Inquiry

if you give a man a fish, he’ll eat for a day; if you teach him how to fish, he’ll eat for a lifetime

This is so within  a community of learning, for if we simply read and absorb the information presented by another, then that answers just that one query at that one time; but if we read the answer, then de-construct and analyse that information, investigate it further and add another facet then the answer creates a broader perspective and deeper understanding.

The concept of community of inquiry opens discussion, inviting analysis and investigation to improve understanding and increase knowledge.  Creating a culture of critical analysis offers opportunity to experiment and to think laterally to really make a difference.

We’re continually exposed to these opportunities through informal forums like think tanks and brain storming, and formal processes like investigation and research and analysis.   When I am in a Community of Inquity, I tend to try to fly under the radar, only venturing a strong opinion when I’m sure of supporting evidence.

This aligns with my ‘ideal’ personal profile of contributing to the online discussion with factual information that is in context with the discussion.  This doesn’t always work of course, but it is my ‘ideal’ profile.  I like to think that I am responsible and responsive to queries and genuinely seek information to share either online or offline.  I am respectful and courteous, non-discriminatory and compassionate with a commitment to practically and proactively supporting those within the community.

Having completed my first week of fieldwork placement at Helensvale Library this week my perspective of the services provided by public libraries was informed by the diverse programs and products run by the library.  The team of librarians, library technicians, library assistants, IT specialists and community organisations work together at Helensvale to provide the public with the information and services they need.  Community programs provided young families with an introduction to rhyme and literature through regular morning meetings with singing, dancing and a bubble machine.  School-age children were invited to undertake STEM experiments working individually and in teams to discover simple scientific and engineering concepts through craft-type play activities.  Older children were encouraged to experiment with Minecraft, Scratch and Digiworks programs run by librarians and other tech-savvy team members.  Adolescent and adult patrons were offered assistance in access to the internet, use of computers, operation of the printer/copier/scanner and basic access to resources including DVDs, music scores, CDs, audio books, books and magazines.

The library team was cohesive and collaborative in its delivery of information and literacy services, respecting the diverse levels of ability of its patrons and taking care to understand their needs and respond to their queries.  This kind of collaborative culture has been developed through an environment where experimentation and exploration is encouraged throughout the team.  It has evolved from observation and survey of users to asssess their needs and to meet their expecations.

Technology has changed the nature of library ‘business’.  Self check-out and check-in is accepted by an estimated 96% of the branch patrons, with patrons encouraged to manage their individual accounts online using their library membership card to access the catalogue, information about loans, holds and upcoming events at the library.

Access to computers, printing, copying and scanning services, together with free wi-fi access has brought a different vibe to the library with many arriving at the library at 9am with their laptops, phones and briefcases as if the library is their office.  Visitors to the area use library services to access free wifi to check emails.  New residents join the library so that they can use the products and services and become involved in programs of learning.   It’s a vibrant community of people who work together to engage in self-education, self-improvement, recreational learning and reading and discovery of new and not so new technology.

This sharing of knowledge and information and making available the tools and facilities needed to support self-education supports many within the community who may not otherwise have access to formal learning.  It also provides an open forum for sharing of knowledge, information and skills.   While Helensvale library does not currently have a formal Makerspace, programs and events provide activities that fit within the regulatory frameworks of health and safety.

As Liz McGettigan stated we need to ensure that the 21st Century library will continue to engage with community in the format and with the content that the users desire.

Who, how, what and why intro

I’m a life-long learner with a belief that education (and information) leads to greater tolerance and understanding across the world.  I confess I’m quirky, coming from a traditional conservative background, I’ve always pushed the boundaries a bit and have tried to follow my dreams and passions whenever I could.   My partner, three girls, two boys and a dog make my family circle complete.  We love to get together whenever we can and we all enjoy the great outdoors, but most especially the beach at Byron Bay.

Making it all work – uni, work, home time, ‘my’ time – takes a little organising but I do try to  have just a bit of equilibrium in my life.  I like to walk, entertain, listen to live music, see live theatre and I love travel, either locally, nationally or overseas.  My travel bug started with long car trips and light aircraft travel in western Queensland and New South Wales.  Years (and thousands of kilometres) later, I still have wanderlust. If I can’t go there, then I enjoy movies about travel, destinations, geography and natural history.  I’m still trying to master photobooks and paperless record keeping for everything, but I just can’t throw away all those original artefacts that my artistic family create.  When I finish my Masters, I keep telling myself.

Where I’m up to…

As a final semester student of Masters in IT – Library and Information Sciences – I am happy that I will finish the course this semester, understanding so much more about information management and emerging technologies.  The road has been a little rocky along the way as I have sometimes been overwhelmed with the deluge of information and technology delivered via the units.  However – I am still here, learning through a collaborative workspace (that totally freaked me out to begin with) and accepting that it’s only through experiment, making mistakes, and more exploring that I continue to build on my knowledge base and pack a few more tools in the toolkit.

Where I’ve been before…

My diverse work experience includes everything from basic admin to executive assistance, to flight attendant, retail manager, legal practice management, parliamentary services and 10+ years in school libraries.   I have used information organisation and information management in all of these positions, from colour coding filing systems to complex customer relationship management systems and implementation and integration of databases.

Where I want to go…

I see myself as an information manager more so than a librarian – but the line is blurred, as I think that  ‘library’ skills are synchronous with ‘information management’ skills.  My fieldwork placement at Helensvale Library proved to be an eye-opener to the diversity of community engagement offered by the library.   From toddler rhyme times to one on one sessions assisting patrons in the use of mobile devices there was a full spectrum of community engagement offered far and beyond literature loans in many formats.  Making a contribution to guiding self-learning and self-education in an informal environment is really appealing to me.  I’d like to work within a team of people who aim to make a difference for people who might not otherwise have the opportunity to learn.

Optimising optimism…

That would have to be either my Pollyanna attitude or my completely ridiculous sense of humour.  Old-fashioned as it may seem, there really always is a bright side. (My thanks go to Monty Python for bringing this perspective more up to date).  I think that the ability to keep looking at an issue from different perspectives and remaining optimistic really add to my cope-ability and dogged determination to keep going to reach my goals.

Superpower on show…

Apparently I am a natural networker, gathering information and delivering it to the right people at the right time.  Does this mean that I also talk a lot?  Perhaps it does – but maybe it also means that people see me as a good listener and communicator.  So I guess if that’s my superpower that shines brightest, then I’m very happy with that.

My ideal superpower…

I agree with Kate – teleportation would be the best – commuting from the Gold Coast is so time-consuming and tiring.  Having the ability to complete mundane tasks like laundry and cleaning at the push of a button so I had more ‘people’ time would be great. So my ideal superpower seems to shape to being able to create more time to be where I want to be, doing the things I love to do.